How To Write And Share A Memory

While some of you may know exactly what you want to say, and how to say it, many of us avoid writing because we fear that we’re not skillful, or we have bad memories of long-ago English classes, or we worry about grammar and spelling rather than the story we want to tell.

But everyone is equal when it comes to recalling a memory that is important to them. No writing tutors are needed. Just trust what a memory feels like and where it takes you. Once you step into the memory and remember details, the rest will follow naturally.

So, think small. Try to remember one story that encapsulates the person you lost and what they meant to you. Try to be specific. Details are everything. Scents, sounds & colors. Places and names shared. Is there something in particular that reminds you of them? A song? An object? A time of day? A game you played together? A season? A particular saying or phrase that they frequently said? Only you know the answer to these key questions.

A tip: try to write first, by hand, on paper. Over the course of a few days, jot down what comes to you. You might use these notes in your story. You might not.  Also, read what others have submitted to the site.  Their stories will inspire you.

If you do not have internet access, or would be more comfortable submitting a story through the mail, please submit at: WhoWeLostKy/PO Box 7031/Louisville, KY 40257.

Want to Share?

When you’re ready, log back on to the site and write your story on the form (“Write Their Stories“). Then, just hit ‘Share’: You will receive a confirmation email that contains the contents of your post. It’s a good idea to print out the email so you can keep a record of what you wrote. Once the post is reviewed to be sure the content is appropriate, it will be posted on this site with your consent.

Finally: Writing can trigger strong emotions, which can have therapeutic benefits, but writing is not a substitute for professional therapy, especially when dealing with a tragic death. If you feel like writing these memories is too painful, please stop and speak to someone who can help.

Don’t Want to Share?

You have a few choices for your story:

  1. Print out the “Who We Lost” Worksheet PDF form here, and then write and keep your story. Perhaps, you’ll share it privately.
  2. If you are having difficulty figuring out what to say, print out this “Story Template” PDF, designed to help you access specific memories. Fill it out and see where the questions take you. Maybe just filling out the form is enough for you for now.

Finally: Writing can trigger strong emotions, which can have therapeutic benefits, but writing is not a substitute for professional therapy, especially when dealing with a tragic death. If you feel like writing these memories is too painful, please stop and speak to someone who can help.